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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 203 (some duplicates have been removed)
are coming out on the streets and to vote in an election that matters. >> we'll be live with the latest on the french intervention and where north africa is the new front in the battle against terrorism. and we will be asking why the issue of abortion is still so divided. a special report from mississippi. >> also aaron is taking a look at global unemployment, and that is a huge number, aaron. >> it's a staggering number. 197 million people around the world are now without a jofpblet 13% are under 24. are we creating a generation of non-workers? >> it's 12:00 moon in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington and 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem where more than 5.5 million israeliings are expected to vote? an election that is expected to see benjamin netanyahu return to office. he is facing relidgeous parties and while security seen by many as netanyahu's strong point, the economy has also been a big issue. more from our colleague. >> yes. welcome to jerusalem where we will be broadcasting for the next two days. israel's election. driving to the heart of a sensitive but still stagnant process of peacemaking
will in the future. his surprise showing in the election could make him a key player in coalition talks. flash floods in the andes, supply is contaminated. also in the program, aaron is here with the latest business news. looks like a shy and is coming off of apple? >> we are looking at a shift in the technology world. apple shares bit more than 30% in the last few months. the new iphone is stumbling. the question is this, are the best days of apple behind them? >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem, 12 noon in london, where david cameron has said it is time to give the british people a choice about membership in the european union. the prime minister pledged to hold a simple in or out referendum by the end of 2017. but the catch is he may not be prime mr. by then. and there are already plenty of voices in your saying that membership is not like a menu where you get to pick and choose. our political correspondent reports. >> it had been a long time coming, but at last david cameron delivered his big speech in europe. he began with what had gone wrong. not everyone, he said, wanted
. but the omens are not good. her coalition has just lost a regional election that was widely viewed as a test of public opinion. >> at first, it looked like the german chancellor's party would win. when the final ballots were counted, it became clear the democrats were on their way out. the results show the coalition of angela merkle's party or one seat behind the opposition. the loss by the christian democrats came about because their supporters tried to vote strategically. usually, christian democrat voters cast a ballot for free democrats. at first, they were thrilled at their score. >> i think it is no surprise some conservatives actually gave us a vote to make sure we would be able to continue with the coalition. >> as the votes were counted, it became clear the political blood transfusion had not work. .- worked how could she continued to help the free democrats across germany without hurting her own party poppies -- party potsies popularity. even her star power was not enough to turn things around. keeping the coalition partner ally came at a heavy price, one she may not want to pay ag
and elsewhere around the globe. israelis went to the polls in general elections today. prime minister jet -- prime minister benjamin netanyahu claimed victory after exit polls showed he would likely lead, the government with a narrow majority. our correspondent is in jerusalem with the latest. >> welcome to jerusalem after three months of a lackluster election campaign. suddenly, israeli politics came alive today about an hour before the polls closed. there was growing excitement and speculation. as expected, benjamin netanyahu is likely to lead the next government. he will be the prime minister for the next four years, but it is a weakened prime minister. his coalition did not get the number of seats it wanted. only 31, according to exit polls. that is down from the 42 that the two parties had during the last election. what kind of coalition will be formed? it could be the right and religious parties. that is not what he wants. the television presenter, his party came in second place. he said his party will not expect to be in any coalition. will it be a shaky coalition between the right
with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one that involves major changes and giving the british public a say in what happens. >> when that referendum comes, let me say now that if we can negotiate such an arrangement, i will campaign for it with al
-- she pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton'
>> one of the first to cast the vote in israel's election. you're watching "al jazeera." we meet a boy who feels betrayed by the world. the u.n. intervenes in the south china seas. police officers in mexico say they have had enough. israelis are voting in their general election. binyamin netanyahu is a clear favorite to win another term in office. we're covering the election for us of there. is it shaping up? .> we're in west jerusalem there have been a steady trickle of voters coming and. sraelis are is re eligible to vote. it looks like to be a good turnout. the question is to what extend binyamin netanyahu can claim a mandate for victory. prime minister binyamin netanyahu casting his ballot. >> want them to succeed. >> he has a commanding lead in all polls. there are new kids on israel's political bloc. >> he is trying to make this campaign a personal campaign on his ability to be the prime minister. yes or no? specific questions about policies. >> the votes have been dominating the headlines. the likud party ran on a single ballad. have lost support to this man. they appealed
elections, is thinking fast or has been over the past two weeks of the popularity threshold and angela merkel has been riding and both of their parties are dithering. the sbc slightly inching higher and the sdu inching lower and they're both losing ground in a grander scale. it's the small parties that are the winners, definitely the green wes a record high of over 13%. they're the ones that won the election and lost it for the cdu, not stoeshl democrats themselves. and the liberals, the sdp, many had counted them out and there was an expectation or there was a fear for some that they couldn't even make the century hurdle that you need to get into parliament. they beat that. about you also for the personality ratings and the criticism on a federal scale, but that was his home turf so there was a lot of sympathy vote going in there. the big parties will have to look carefully for coalition partners. the social democrats will try to align themselves with the green that might not be enough. the stronger the greens get, the more the social democrats usually lose and something similar you h
recent elections in the middle east, one in jordan and one in israel. we talk with jordan's ambassador to the united nations prince bin ra'ad and efraim halevy. >> when we first heard the rumblings of the arab spring some may have thought that thises with a train that was passing through the station in and out. i think his majesty understood full well that these were seismic rumblings. and the region has had for a long time been bereft of real refos. his majesty began earlier on. and i think you know now felt that for those who had a vested interest in the stat usco, this is their time to understand-- status quo, this is their time to understand something is changing. >> there is something much more deep that going to happen in the months to am come and there have before been a few indications of this in the last 48 hoursment and that is that the problem of the relationship between religion and state between those who are orthox and traworthodox an thoho are to a large extent secular, how to create a society in which you have common aims, common beliefs, and which people enjoy common r
to make sure that we move towards free and fair elections so that there is a legitimate post couey election area -- post-coup government. we have got a short-term challenge in restoring their security. the french, i think, in partnership with the military, are doing a great job. there are longer-term challenges, restoring things. this is what led to the rebellion and the coup in the first place. >> do you think they should be deploying drones? >> we have used drones against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> thank you very much for joining us from capitol hill tonight. >> thank you. >> in other news now, senior officials say that leon panetta, the defense secretary, decided to lift a ban about women in c
on the dupont. >> thank you so much. >> rose: we turn now to politics and elections in israel and jordan earlier this week. this comes at a time when the winds of change are sweeping through the middle east. since the start of the arab spring political unrest in jordan has intensified. many groups including the muslim brotherhood boy kod the election with more than half of jordan's registered voters participated. this is part of a series of reforms king abdullah ii has implemented to combat political discents. if israel benjamin netanyahu was granted aid third term as a prime minister in the coalition government but the real winner maybe lapid worst centrist party gain gained substantial ground, joining me is jordan ambassador to the united nation and efraim halevy who served in the israel national security council. i'm pleased to have them both on this program to talk together at this table about important things that are going on in their region including elections, mr. ambassador, thank you for coming. tell me what we read into the jordanian elections and what they tell us about the f
pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimon
the parliamentary elections this week. will they satisfy protesters or inflame them? we'll get the king's reaction. then, the prime minister of r h russia dmitry medvedev. some call it a new cold war. who's to blame and will russia help in syria? we'll discuss it all. >>> also, the algerian hostage crisis that left dozens dead. is this a sign of a grave, new terror threat? i'll tell you my view. >>> but, first, here's my take. every year at davos people like me try to get a sense of the mood of the place. take the temperature of people in this frosty mountain resort. obviously, i will give you a highly impressionistic and personal picture, but one i find useful since davod does bring together leaders and government, business and media and even the ngo community from all corners of the world. it is genuinely global in a way that few conferences are. so, what is the mood? well, there's a sense of calm, a relief that many storms that seem like they might be overwhelming like the euro crisis have been weathered. people from america are optimistic. those from emerging markets more so, but everywhere t
on president obama's foreign policy challenges in his second term. what's the meaning of the election in israel this week as that gets sorted out and netanyahu tries to build a new government? there's the threat of iran, what do we make of it? >> well, we have to see what government actually is formed, it's a coalition government in israel. i think it's likely now to be a center-right government rather than the right wing rump government that looked likely given the pulse before the election. that is essentially better news. it means that israel is going, i think, to be more willing to engage in making peace with the palestinians. that the two-stage solution which is on life support at the moment has a chance to breathe again. i wouldn't take it further than that, but there's a limited sliver of hope put it that way in that regard. when it comes to iran, i don't think the election changes things that much. essentially this is an american-led problem. and as much as netanyahu threatens force, i think he will take the lead from president obama who has made it clear he's not going to allow iran to
in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat security abroad. >> as i have mentioned many times i take responsibility and nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger, and more secure. now, taking responsibility meant moving quickly in those first uncertain hours and days to respond to the immediate crisis, but, also, to further protect our people and posts in high-threat areas across the region and the world. it meant launching an independent investigation to determine exactly what happened in b
elections. he was asked if the president has met his expectations during the first term. >> he has seen the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congre
'll give you a little straight talk. look at the last election. look at the last election. we are losing dramatically the hispanic vote, which we think should be ours for a variety of reasons. and we've got to understand that. second of all, we can't go on forever with 11 million people living in this country in the shadows. >> i want to bring in "new york times" columnist nick chrisoff and jackie kucinich. is this time different? you were looking at the full screen earlier there. you have a bipartisan group. big hitters in there. schumer, mccain, rubio.menendez. it feels to me as if a month of sundays may have just hit the calendar. the stars are aligning. it does feel different. whether it's going to be enough i don't know. i think republicans have really been sobered by the last election results. i think they feel they have to do something. seeing leadership from people like marco rubio i think really does give a lot of republicans who might have doubts otherwise a real chance to think again. >> the credibility, the aura, the halo that may be needed here. jackie, those eight senators
netanyahu's right-wing coalition wins a narrow victory in israel's general election. a centrist party makes an unexpected strong showing. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." experts following the move buys north korea are watching the clock. they say it's only a matter of time before the country carries out another nuclear test. north korean leaders promised to boost their military power in reaction to a u.n. security council resolution condemning their recent rocket launch. security council members passed the resolution unanimously. it expands existing sanctions, adding four individuals and six organizations, including the space agency. assets will be frozen and the individuals will also face a travel ban. officials in pyongyang are showing defiance. >> this suggests north korean authorities are prepared to conduct a third nuclear tests following ones in 2006 and 2009. they also declared they will no longer recognize a joint statement in 2005 from the six party talks on their nuclear development. that includes plans for the country to abandon all nuclear weapons and programs. officials fr
were reelected in the general election here in 2015, it would be part of their mandate and the platform that there would offer the british people and in-out referendum around 2018. so five years from now. the great concern of this, even if there is agreement in the european union, the great concern is that now a leading prime minister from a leading european country has said the sellout and other european countries might follow suit. the worry in big european capitals like paris and berlin is whether this will be criticized and if europe will only be as strong as its most skeptical parts. and the worry is that europe might start to collapse from the outside in words. so i don't think that they will take this speech very kindly one bit. i certainly don't think that they will want to acknowledge the kind of change that mr. chairman has said is necessary. >> israel's prime minister and his right-wing bloc has done worse than expected in parliamentary elections. benjamin netanyahu is coming victory. now he has to negotiate with other fiscal parties to form a broader coalition. >> i am proud
an inflation target of 2%. >>> people in israel are casting ballots in a prime election. benjamin netanyahu is expected to keep his job. >>> welcome to nhk "newsline." central bank policy makers have agreed to give shinzo abe what he wants, a 2% inflation target. it's part of abe's plan to tackle deflation with bolder, monetary easing measures. bank of japan and eight others agreed on it saying they. boj officials have previously made it a goal to bring 1% inflation within reach but the new, clearer target requires some bold steps. the document also addresses the role of the government in revitalizing japan's economy. it describes how politicians should promote growth and restore fiscal health. along with drafting the joint statement, boj officials have agreed to introduce open-ended asset purchasing. under a new program from january 2014 the central bank will purchase a certain amount of financial assets every month. no termination date is being set for the scheme. the new measure will expand the total size of the asset purchase program, or app, by about 10 trillion yen, or $110 billion, i
's old seat:. israeli elections happened, surprising results. we'll bring you the israeli council general on here to talk about what that means for this country. >> the former tv news anchor who called attention to the high cost of living a social injustice. >> it's very clear, they were saying let's go to the center. >> cenk: all right we'll see if that means that we're going an iran or not. and obama versus fox news, tonight on "the young turks." it's go time. >> cenk: you know, one of the large issues in this campaign was immigration reform, right? well, the republicans were against it. all of a sudden when results did not go in their direction they're reconsidering their position. we got a gang of eight four republicans, four democrats who have new immigration reform. look at that. we'll go to a report from "abc news" on that. >> it's a hot-button issue coming to the forefront again immigration reform. four democrats and four republicans have unveiled a plan to tackle it. >> we can't go on forever with 11 million people living in this country in the shadows in an illegal status. >> re
concern. i want to play something that ted cruz, newly elected texas senator, republican, had to say this weekend, about gun control. and let's come back and talk about it. >> you know, there actually isn't the so-called gun show loophole, that doesn't exist. any licensed firearm dealer that else at a gun show has to have a background check. what it doesn't apply to is personal sales, one on one. and that's true whether it's at a gun show or -- >> i would point out, the key there is a licensed firearm dealer. some of these people, you can sort of apply as a, you know, you sell at a gun show occasionally, that's the gun show loophole. but, ted cruz gets to speak for lots and lots of people. how do you navigate, whether it's in delaware or nationally with what your father is trying to do, how do you navigate the politics of this? there's a reason the assault weapons ban sunseted in '04, because the politics of it simply didn't sustain. there's a reason barack obama didn't talk all that much about it in 2008. how do you keep the momentum to do something? >> the facts are important. sena
that what we are celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president, but what we are doing is celebrating each other and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy not only of our past but also of our future. god bless you guys. i love you. we will see you tomorrow. (applause) >> the president and the first lady the vice president, the second lady seeming chipper after his official swearing in earlier today. this party was a candlelight vigil. it's not exactly a vigil, it's more of a party. there are a lot of people in that room who paid a lot of money for this inauguration and prior to tonight to get barack obama re-elected. to get a flavor of what's going on in the room these are individual and corporate donors. to get tickets to this event if you were an individual if you wanted the washington package in addition to a couple seats to the parade or other items you had to donate 250,000 dollars if you were a corporation you had to donate a million. the packages wen
. >> brown: then, from tel aviv, margaret warner reports on the israeli elections, as prime minister benjamin netanyahu's party was on track to stay in power by a narrow margin. netanyahu tries to put together, it's sure to include new faces and new agendas that will influence the country. >> ifill: we examine a new study on concussions, showing the impact of hard hits on the brains of living but retired n.f.l. players. >> i go through stages where i think how come i can't remember that and i always wondered are these age-related or are they conclusion related? >> brown: and we mark the 40th anniversary of the "roe v. wade" decision by the supreme court, with a look at the strategies of abortion rights advocates and opponents. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only a river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world. and perhaps even yourself. viking river cruises. exploring the world in comfort. >> bnsf railway.
on what happened to them in the last election. gun control. more republicans backing things like background checks, they stand a good chance of getting stuff done in the next year, while the president has the leverage on his side. >> okay. let's look at another couple of challenges for you, ed. sequestration, that starts march 1st. debt ceiling suspension expiring on may 19th. you think the president's policy goals will get bogged down because of these upcoming deadlines? >> that's an interesting question. we are trying to sort that one out. this punt into may, with the debt ceiling suggests that it buys everyone time on fiscal issues and might allow congress to turn its attention to immigration and gun control and other issues. certainly, the fiscal debate isn't going anywhere. a big question, will sequestration indeed happen if it does happen, does it happen assith currently written, do we make changes or the white house come up with a way to stave it off and get republicans and democrats to agree? a big push under way to get started on gun control, immigration, hearings next w
at the last election. look at the last election. we are losing dramatically the hispanic vote, which we think should be ours for a variety of reasons. >> alice, for a variety of reasons it was not. mainly because of the anti-immigration rhetoric that was doled out by the standard bear. mitt romney all through 2012. can this reverse that course? >> oh, it sure can. we learned a lesson. i think this is a great first step. the framework for this plan being that it's a good consensus of republicans and democrats. it's a great start. i think victoria hit on it. senator rubio also hit on it. fairness is critical in this. the framers of this immigration plan say this is tough, but it's fair. that's important. those that have been going about obtaining citizenship through the legal means should be front of the line and those who have not should go to the back of the line. i think there's also an important emphasis on employer verification and border security. all these are good components to a fair system for legal immigration. >> the national journal has a piece out today saying, karen, in it, quote
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 203 (some duplicates have been removed)